Silver Spurs

 
Silver Spurs-Miralee Ferrell
Silver Spurs-Miralee Ferrell
Silver Spurs-Miralee Ferrell

 
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From the Back Cover: Kate’s dream of owning a horse has finally happened. But now her best friend Tori has no money to buy a horse. So Kate comes up with a plan—she’ll raise money by boarding horses and hosting a show in her family’s barn. It seems the perfect solution until Melissa, the girl who disses Kate and Tori at school, shows up to board her horse, determined to compete in their show and win the silver spurs. Will their plan be ruined—or does God have something better in store for them all? Silver Spurs is a tale of overcoming fears and trusting God with your dreams.
 
Publication Date: June 1, 2015
 
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fter reading the first book in the series, I wanted to continue along with the author and see what new adventures Kate would experience. A lot of the same story continues through this book, so it may be somewhat challenging to find new insights in this review, but I did enjoy this story as well and it will […]

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Posted June 1, 2015 by

 
Our Review
 
 
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fter reading the first book in the series, I wanted to continue along with the author and see what new adventures Kate would experience. A lot of the same story continues through this book, so it may be somewhat challenging to find new insights in this review, but I did enjoy this story as well and it will appeal to those who enjoyed the first book in the series.

Once again, the story is told from Kate’s perspective and she is a typical young teenager; the prose and dialogue fit well with her as our protagonist, even as the story is told in third person. Tori and Colt are both present in this new installment, as well as another girl from school, Melissa. She is largely the book’s antagonist, but the mystery of why is solved in this novel.

We do learn more about riding in this book, as well as the many details involved in running a barn and putting on a horse show. While the particulars may be too in depth for some kids, my guess is that the young readers picking up this book will devour any horse-related information they can garner; the relatable plot of the novel is just icing on the cake.

Topics covered relate to spiritual matters including prayer, but there are also instances of just moral and neighborly behavior, too. Not everyone is a Christian, and at one point in particular, Kate tells someone her Christian faith is what motivates her behavior. All Christians in the book would be unrealistic, and giving a good example of sharing our faith is important for young people, even if the Gospel is not presented in the exact moment we read.

At the same time, Kate is not perfect and sometimes her attitude and jealousy get the best of her. When that happens, sometimes her mother corrects her, and sometimes she senses the conviction of the Holy Spirit, confesses and changes her behavior without further prompting, even when it’s difficult or her friends think she’s trying too hard to do the right thing. Her resistance to peer pressure is another positive pattern for the readers to emulate.

Some of the story lags a bit toward the middle, but pacing probably needs to be a bit different for kids than adults. And I did enjoy the nice buildup of tension between Melissa and the other kids before we learn why she is mean despite the kindness that she occasionally exhibits toward Pete, Kate’s autistic younger brother.

Parents will again be pleased to learn there is still no romance per se, though at one point, Tori asks Colt if he is “crushing on” Melissa. For the age, this seems appropriate to me, especially as it goes no further and he affirms he is not. I liked that Colt could be nice to a girl and defend her to others without there being a romance involved—he is just doing the right thing.

The tale is fairly predictable, as was the first book, but there were some surprises thrown in as well, which kept the book feeling exciting, especially toward the end with a nice twist of a heartwarming variety. I believe kids in the intended age range of 8-12 will enjoy it, especially as it’s probably the fantasy of most of the kids who would pick it up—who wouldn’t want to be surrounded by horses all day, even despite the hard work? Parents will appreciate the clean subject matter and the good role model Kate is, despite her faults that will make her likable and relatable to the kids who are reading her story.


Lynda Edwards

 


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